Last Updated on May 22, 2020

Are you needing a scalder to help defeather your chickens? Here are the best chicken scalders to make removing chicken feathers a much easier process.

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Best Chicken Scalder Overall

If you are looking for a really good chicken scalder, this Rite Farm Products 5 in 1 Propane PRO Scalder has everything that you need except the propane.

It comes with a 42 quart pot with a pour spout, a 28,500 BTU burner with adjustable propane dial, a stand that wraps around the pot to keep it from falling off, a thermometer to keep the temps at 145 degrees, and a steam/fry/boil basket if you want to use it for that as well.

It can hold 2 chickens or 1 turnkey at a time.

With all these features, this is our choice for best chicken scalder overall.

 

 

Best Chicken Scalder Second Choice

This scalding kit is similar to the previous kit but comes with a smaller pot and is a little cheaper.

It is actually being marketed as a deep fryer but will work just as well for scalding.

Because of this, it actually comes with with a few extras like a poultry rack and a marinade injector.

Since the pot is smaller, you won’t have as much room to work with so keep that in mind.

But if you aren’t wanting to spend as much as you would on the first scalding kit, this Stark Deluxe 30 QT kit should still get the job done.

 

 

How To Scald Chickens?

Best Chicken Scalder Featured Image

Before you get started, you will need a large pot, a burner, propane, and thermometer. Add water to the pot and sit it on top of the burner.

Turn the burner on and heat the water to 145 degrees Fahrenheit. Make sure you constantly check the temperature to keep it at this level.

Once you have killed the chicken and the water is at 145 degrees Fahrenheit, simply hold the chicken by the legs and dip it into the water.

Swirl it around to make sure the hot water gets underneath the feathers.

Pull the chicken out and pull the feathers to see if they can be removed easily. If they can, it’s ready for plucking.

 

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Casey

My name is Casey and I'm the creator of Farmhacker.com. I created this site so I could share with you everything I know about farming and hopefully help you become a better farmer in the process.

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